Solar Hot Water Monitoring System

Eric Edwards of EJESolar.com created a system that takes solar energy and heats water for his home. He uses Sun Strip Solar panels to heat the water. With a single solar panel Eric is able to heat a 60 gallon tank to temperatures beyond 160°F. He uses the ioBridge IO-204 to data log and actively monitors the water heating system by getting alerts and updates on his mobile phone.

Water Tank and ioBridge IO-204

Water Tank and ioBridge IO-204

ioBridge IO-204 with Temperature Sensors

ioBridge IO-204 with Temperature Sensors

Eric monitors and data logs the temperatures of the the hot water storage tank, the collectors, and the outside temperature in real-time using the ioBridge IO-204 and temperature sensors. This data allows Eric to calculate BTUs collected per day and translate into a dollar figure to track savings. He has surrounded himself with the data to make sure there is no system damage, freezing, etc., by creating a web site to view the data, setting ioBridge message alerts, and using a Google Gadget to display the temperatures collected by the IO-204.

Visit EJESolar.com to see a live view of the data collected by the solar hot water system as well as some more details behind this solar hot water heating system. Ingenious!

Screen Shot of Solar Array and Collected Data (EJESolar.com)

Screen Shot of Solar Array and Collected Data (EJESolar.com)

Happy Holidays from ioBridge

Santa vs. Domo

Santa vs. Domo

We wanted to take a moment and thank all of our customers, users, developers, and everyone that makes up the ioBridge Community. Our wish to you and yours is that you have a safe and happy holiday season. Enjoy your downtime, friends, and family.  See you in the New Year!

Enjoy some projects…

  • Xmas-Box.com — Interactive Christmas lights sync to music, songs are selected on web site, and if you are local you can listen to the music on your radio as you watch
  • Pacific Lights – Control Christmas lights in New Zealand
  • Serv O’Beer – Have your iPhone pour a beverage for your New Year’s party
  • Santa vs. Domo – Play with some interactive toys on Andy Leer’s blog and let Santa have it
  • iPhone Controlled Lights – Control your Christmas lights with a touch of your iPhone using the open ioBridge PHP Proxy

Cheers.

Interactive Toy Fighting – Domo vs. Munny

We found out what happens when you place two lovable toys against each other. They attack!

Hack Pittsburgh member Andy Leer created an interactive toy fight featuring Domo and Munny squaring off. You get to control one of the characters and watch the battle via a webcam live. Move over “Internet of Things”  - make way for the “Internet of Vengeful Toys”.

Munny vs. Domo

Munny vs. Domo

The Munny and Domokun are attached to servos. The servos are connected to the ioBridge servo controller and IO-204. You control the toys with  servo slider widgets. Andy’s blog mentions that the next version will have iPhone support.  Visit his blog to play and sweep the leg at the Domo Dojo.

TankedCam Interactive Aquarium [MoreControl.com]

Pete from Pete’s Fishcam and TankedCam fame got a great writeup on MoreControl.com. His system uses the ioBridge IO-204 to control and monitor his fish tank from anywhere.

“Designed for the iPhone/iPod (and Mac/PC desktop), the TankedCam app allows you to turn your  Atlantis into an aquatic home automation paradise.”

Learn more at MoreControl.com and TankedCam.com.

Passive Infrared Webcam Tracker

From the “My Electronics Notepad” blog, Noel Portugal created a tracking webcam using passive infrared (PIR) sensors, a webcam mounted on a servo, and the IO-204 monitor and control module.

PIR Sensors, Webcam, and ioBridge IO-204 Module

PIR Sensors, Webcam, and ioBridge IO-204 Module

Noel was able to pull this off with using the ioBridge Actions. An action is logic created through the ioBridge interface that allows automated events to occur. For example, an action can cause a servo to move to preset position, send an email, update your Facebook status, etc. In Noel’s case, he use the output of the PIR sensor to cause the servo to move to a set position. The output of the PIR is digital – “high” means motion detected and “low” means no motion.

Using two PIRs covering two regions, he was able to detect motion in two regions. If motion is sensed in one area, the webcam points in that direction and if motion is detected in the other area, the servo moves the camera to cover the other region. Very clever.

Here is a video of the webcam tracking in action:

The PIR sensor has been the subject of a recent Adafruit tutorial – it’s available on the Adafruit store and even your local Radio Shack (of all places). For more information about this ioBridge project and other projects Noel dreams up, visit his blog.