Monitoring Utility and Generator Power Sources

Guy from Living Sustainably created a project to monitor his utility and generator power sources. This project came to life after Guy lost power for a couple of days during a wind storm. The emergency power generator kicked on after the power outage, but it failed to transfer power to his property. Guy created a monitoring and alerting system with ioBridge, so he would be sure about the quality of power and that the generator would be ready to go on a future outage. Taking advantage of our cloud services, Guy setup a private dashboard of power info and setup real-time alerts for state changes on the generator. Now, when the generator does self-tests, Guy receives up-to-the minute alerts and knows that the generator is ready for power outages.

Generator emails from ioBridge

[via Living Sustainably]

Hurricane Sandy Tide Levels

Just in case you haven’t heard, there is a giant storm heading towards the East Coast of the United States caused by Hurricane Sandy. If you need more evidence that something is going to happen, you can check out our tide level data that we collect from around Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Storms of this size affect all kinds of weather system data such as pressure, temperature, and tide levels. A recipe for anticipating a major event is when you see the pressure drop and see a change in the amplitude of the tide levels. As you can see below, the tide levels are shifted upwards by 15″ to 20″. Please, stay safe! We will do the same thing as we button-down the hatches at ioBridge HQ.

Hurricane Sandy Tide Levels in Cape Cod

At one of the marinas, we have a security camera setup running off of an APC battery backup system. Here’s what really high tides look like.

Hurricane Sandy Tide Levels Security Cam

Here’s another photo of a dock submerged under water:

Hurricane Sandy Tides Dock Under Water

The system is running an ioBridge Gateway with connected battery-powered sensors over an XBee radio network. The tide level sensors are MaxBotix ultrasonic level sensors. Check out the Technology Review article, Cape Cod is Tweeting, Thanks to the Internet of Things, for more information about our tide project or contact us.

[via TideAlerts.com]

Raspberry Pi Smart Target #piday #raspberrypi

[Noel] posted a tutorial on Instructables on how to build a “Raspberry Pi Smart Target” using a Raspberry Pi and an ioBridge Serial LCD screen. This target tracks and plays sound effects when it gets hit by a flying monkey. It also updates the new Oracle Social Network and Twitter with status updates and photos from a Dropcam. Noel released this project at the Oracle Open World 2012 and it was a hit. Everyone was having fun flinging monkeys at their target.

[via Instructables]

The Social Graph + The Internet of Things

As I get ready for the Pittsburgh Maker Faire, I have been thinking about the intersection of social and objects, and just how I fit into the middle of things. As time goes on we are leaving little trails of data on social networks. Our things are becoming connected and aware of their location and environment and reporting that data to the cloud. This data will get more interesting over time. These thoughts have been lingering for quite a while as for some reason I connected my toaster to Twitter and built interactive lights that link together over social networks. My latest inspiration comes from the Social Graph and the Graph API released by Facebook.

social graph and interent_of_things

What I have created is a socially aware Elmo toy. Instead of tickling Elmo, you Twitter him or Like his Facebook page to get him going. Interestingly enough, Elmo has over 3.6 million likes on Facebook. And, he gets a few likes every minute (trust me I have been tracking him for weeks). The experiment that we are running is what will happen at the Maker Faire. We have written a RealTime.io plugin for ioBridge that is tuned into things, location, and the social graph using Facebook’s API. We are excited to see what will happen at the Maker Faire when makers from all over Pittsburgh come together with their location-aware devices and Facebook accounts. Visitors to the ioBridge demo area will be able to Like Elmo via a QR code. If the graph of you, us, Elmo, the location, and/or your friends all line up, Elmo will get activated in real-time. Elmo has an infectious laugh and we’ve got hear him start singing quite a few times this week.

As our things generate more data, we hope to keep pushing the limits and find meaning. Connections are forming and how we find about what are things know, “who is at the house,” and “if my basement is flooded” will be told to us like other info that we find out about our friends on the Twitter stream or the Facebook news feed or our Google Circles. In fact our friends on our graph may find out before we do.

Internet-connected Geiger Counter Happens to Detect Solar Flares

[Guy] is “Living Sustainably” and has created some great projects such as his Solar Hot Water Heating System and Electric Car Mods. His latest project involves a Geiger counter and some unexpected applications of radiation detection systems. Guy built an Internet-connected Geiger Counter so he could monitor the radiation levels near his home in Maine.

Internet-connected Geiger Counter

“The Geiger-Muller tube is rated to detect alpha, beta and gamma particles.  This means that while it can be used for local testing of radiation, it should also be able to detect astronomical events such as the radiation from solar flares.  So I interfaced it to the web using a spare port on one of my ioBridges so that I could see charts of radiation over a 24 hour and 7 day period.”

Geiger Counter CPM ioBridge Chart

The normal “clicks-per-minute” is 9-12 in his location in the United States. But, one day the radiation level jumped to over 20 CPM! The unexpected jump in radiation was due to a coronal mass ejection (CME) which is better known as a solar flare. Sure enough, there was a reported solar flare that coincided perfectly with the data collected by his Geiger counter.

For more information this project, visit Guy’s website where you can check out the live radiation levels in Maine from his Internet-conencted Geiger Counter.